The Tetley

Aidan Moesby: NO TIME FOR NOSTALGIA

May – August 2014

No Time For Nostalgia, residency was produced as part of A New Reality: Part 3.

Over the course of a three-month production residency with some open studio dates from 9 – 13 July, the artist explored and responded to the building, producing temporary installations for its interior and exterior spaces. Moesby’s interest in the idea of ‘Luddism’ influenced a series of craft-based public events incorporating his passion for wood cutting, bread making, bookmaking, poetry and story telling among other things. His blog documents the project: http://www.notimefornostalgia.wordpress.com

Site-specific art works:
These works created by Moesby during his production residency are installed around the building and on the Brewery Green:

THEY WARM YOU TWICE, 2014
Logs

THE SIGN OF THINGS TO COME, 2014
Fingerpost, wood,text

ECHOES FOR THE WOODSMOKE, 2014
Audio

WOODSMAN MOTIF, 2014
Cyanotype

TIMED OUT, 2014
Time and Date Machine, Various Text.

PRESENCE, 2014
Vinyl Text

TEMPERANCE, 2014
Letterpress Forme, Text

LINGER, 2014
Laser etched text.

WOODSMAN MOTIF, 2014
Laser etch

Corresponding Events:

Friday 11th July, 4-6pm
Charcoal Making Session with Niels Corfield (Edible Cities, Leeds Permaculture)

Join Aidan Moesby and ‘permaculturist’ Niels Corfield outside The Tetley on the Brewery Green for a practical demonstration of the production process of drawing charcoal.

Saturday 12th July, 2pm
The Newcastle Philosophy Society: The Demands of Idleness

Philosophers have tended to praise idleness, seeing inactivity as a prime opportunity for cultivating the philosophical virtues. Similarly religions, while tending to dismiss idleness as a sin, promote leisure and holy-days in order to cultivate a closer relationship to God. To make time is an act of love, so why are we so bad at it? Why do most of us prefer work to idleness as both are equally alienating and intolerable, but at least you get paid for work?

How did work, historically considered an indignity and even a punishment, come to be the major source of our self-identity? If idleness has become too demanding, what does this tell us about our relationship with time, contemplation, and life’s biggest questions?

newphilsoc.org.uk/wpress/

Sunday 13th July, 2pm
Natural Nostalgia Taxidermy Talk with Dr. Ebony Andrews

In an era where sanitised animal parts wrapped in plastic and displayed on supermarket shelves is commonplace, but real contact with animals and nature is increasingly restricted to orchestrated spectacles such as the zoo, the wildlife park, and even the local pet store, a collective longing and nostalgia for unmediated experiences and conformations with nature has proliferated. Facilitated by Dr. Ebony Andrews, artist, museum natural science professional and taxidermy historian, Natural Nostalgia will provide an informal platform for discussion concerning our complex relationship with nature in the 21st century.

www.ebonyandrews.co.uk

Aidan Moesby lives and works in Newcastle upon Tyne.